Teacher field trip – a lesson in “going with the flow”

Last Tuesday was the last day of school before students left for winter vacation.  It’s essentially the end of the year for them. 

  • (Side note: Elementary students will come back in early Feb. for 10 or so days, then start two weeks of spring break, and return for the start of the new school year on March 1st).

I was asked on Monday afternoon if I wanted to eat a crab lunch with the other teachers – a celebration of sorts.  Naturally I said “yes!”  That was all the information I was given.

Tuesday:  Around noon, one of the teachers comes and grabs me and says it’s time to go.  I grab my things and ask if someone will be able to drive me back to the school after lunch.  I’m told…”Yes, the bus will drop you off.”  Hmmm…ok.

We walk outside and continue to walk past the row of cars in the parking lot…and straight for a huge bus. 

Lisa: “Where are we going?”

Korean Teacher: “To Yeongdeok.”  (Pronounced Young-duck)

Lisa: “Is that the name of the restaurant?”

Korean Teacher: “It is the city we are going to. It will take about 2 hours by bus.  We will eat crab there. We will be home after 7 o’clock tonight.”

Lisa: “OOOOOOOO….KKKKKKK.  I didn’t know.  I thought lunch was around here. Nobody told me anything.”  I then proceed to board the bus – the point of no return.

Fortunately, the bus was pretty nice and the moment we sat down, we were bombarded with endless snacks, oranges, candy, and dried squid.  🙂

map for blog

The city of Yeongdeok is small in comparison to Daegu (maybe a million people).  It’s a major fishing/seafood kind of place…and it’s especially known for its crab.

  • (Side note: That major body of water you see is currently under dispute.  Koreans call it the “East Sea,” while the Japanese call it the “Sea of Japan.”  And if you know anything about Korean/Japanese relations…it’s unlikely any side is going to cave.)

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Big crab signs like these are all over the city.  They apparently want to make sure you know you can eat crab here. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 30 or so of us teachers got to the restaurant and immediately FEASTED on crab.  Koreans call it “bamboo crab.”  I hadn’t eaten this type of crab before, but it was really delicious.  It was SUPER fresh and the shells were really fragile.  They like to suck it right out of the shell…no lemon, no butter.  Of course, the Koreans can eat it without spilling a single shell on themselves, while I was splattering crab juice on myself and everyone sitting around me. 

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Look at the carnage below.

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We walked around the city for a bit afterwards and then boarded the bus home.  Many of the big tour buses in Korea are equipped with karaoke machines.  So that’s what we did on the way home.

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I was able to order some crab to take home…so of course, I brought Micah back some.  He definitely enjoyed!

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Back to the title of this blog posting…if you want to stay sane while living in Korea, you just have to accept the fact that…1) You will be given little to no information about things going on – even the same day they are happening 2) Changes occur all the time…always last minute – and again, not always communicated to you 3) If you overplan, you are doomed for frustration.  TIK – This is Korea! 🙂

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3 Responses to “Teacher field trip – a lesson in “going with the flow””


  1. 1 Kami Ramirez December 29, 2009 at 11:58 pm

    TIK!? We said TIC (this is China) all the time! Had the same experiences with little to no information and last minute changes ALL the time!

    Glad you’re having such a great time! Happy New Year!!

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    Any help would be really appreciated!

  3. 3 http://macnamarawuf.edublogs.org October 3, 2014 at 11:20 pm

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